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Over-plagued with deadly siege, the Eastern Ghota is still subject to a vicious military regime attack in an attempt to force its people to flee for their life or just die in place. The sufferings in Eastern Ghota have been continuing, unabated for more than five running years, leaving the area bereaved of almost all basic necessities for survival with grave shortage of resources. The Syrian regime is currently making attempts to displace the civilians by wreaking havoc in the area, preventing the entry of basic foodstuffs, and denying medical access for critical cases or even their exit for treatment.

In a series of reports issued by the Information Management Unit (IMU) of the Assistance Coordination Unit (ACU) and through its network of enumerators and in coordination with the Local Council of Rural Damascus Governorate, the 2nd edition of the report ” Siege and Death in the Eastern Ghouta” is issued to sound off warning bells about the hardship situation in Eastern Ghota, much as it is intended to raise the alarm regarding the displacement enforced and the human rights violations committed by the regime. The report at the same time sheds lights on the looming catastrophe before it may occur.

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The Status of Service Provision in Idleb City report was written upon the request of several stakeholders. The report is considered a pilot project, to be used as a proof of concept for IMU’s new, mixed methods research methodology. The report provides information about the status of service provision in Idleb City, as well as public opinions of these services. Following a feedback process, the IMU will produce a report that assesses services in communities throughout Idleb province.

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The Information Management Unit (IMU) of the Assistance Coordination Unit (ACU) conducted a
multi-sectoral assessment for the fifth release of its quarterly-issued Dynamic Monitoring Report
(DYNAMO). A total of 94 sub-districts within 10 governorates were assessed to give a comprehensive
account of the humanitarian situation there, and to inform a proper response in all sectors.
This assessment was funded by the ACU and included consultation with the sector leads of the
working groups and other humanitarian partners…

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The Assistance Coordination Unit (ACU) has issued the 24th monthly monitoring report on the internally displaced People’s (IDPs) camps in northern Syria. The assessment was conducted to assess the living conditions of the IDPs in camps during July 2015.

The total number of covered camps in July was 167 camps. During this month seven camps were closed or merged and six new camps were established.

The acting IRC organization had to pause all its activities for 17 days in camps, this led to a critical situation there with halting of all services and increasing the suffering of IDPs. Demographically, the number of IDPs remained almost the same, except some of them returned to their homes due to lack of services and high living expenses inside the camps.

Regarding food security sector, Human Appeal Organization, Kader, and Turkish IHH continued to distribute food baskets in some camps in Atma, Al-Karama, Salqin, Al-Rahma and Qah clusters. However, the food aid provided by active organizations in this sector is insufficient compared to the urgent IDP needs.

The Blue Crescent Organization distributed 1,342 medical treatment boxes for lice and allergy, because of wide spread of skin diseases among the IDPs, due to unprecedented high temperatures. However, Jarablus camps are left without any medical points since ISIL forces controlled the city.

Medical Corps Organization has distributed 1,359 hygiene kits in Bab Al Salameh border camp. Camps’ IDPs are suffering from many obstacles in WASH sector like sewage issues, ignorance of dumping holes, discharging and turning open sewers into regular networks. Many camps could not meet the needs of their populations of water, either because of the absence of water points in the camps, or the existing water points are insufficient. Another problem is the presence of inoperative water networks and taps, which are not supported by any related organizations.

No significant changes happened in education sector compared to June. Schools are still closed since the end of past academic year, and IRC supported schools halted its activities for 17 days in July. Securing education for all children in the camps is still an unsolved challenge. Schools are not available in all camps, so the students are forced to head to neighbouring camps’ schools, or refrain from going to school under parental pressure.

Regarding shelter and NFIs, the biggest challenge that faces the IDPs is the high rate of worn-out tents that need replacement, which exceeded 80% in some camps. This violates the Sphere standards which state that a tent’s age should not exceed 6 months. The concerned organizations’ inability to cover this need, and the people’s aspiration to improve their lives, pushed them to construct stone rooms randomly. The IDP’s top priority for NFIs was water gallons, tent support as second priority and cleaning tools as third priority.

Regarding the IDP’s top priorities, WASH needs came first with 25%, followed by food security, then shelter and NFIs as third priority after being second priority in June statistics.

 

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